Hundreds of people intercepted on small boats in the Channel

After an eleven-day hiatus, during which no small boats entered UK waters, the first dinghy was spotted and intercepted around 1am on Sunday.

Hundreds of people aboard several small boats were intercepted in the English Channel by British authorities this morning, GB News can confirm.

After an eleven-day hiatus, during which no small boats entered UK waters, the first dinghy was spotted and intercepted around 1am on Sunday.

Those on board were taken by lifeboat to the port of Dover.

Since dawn, at least seven small boats have been spotted and intercepted. At least 230 people have now been taken to the UK Border Force processing center in Dover.

Organized crime gangs, who run the illegal people smuggling operation, had been unable to put boats in the English Channel in recent days, due to weather conditions.

Reports that the “Rwandan policy” planned by the British government was responsible for the disruption of small boat crossings have been dismissed by local sources, who insist the weather was the cause.

The latest migrants to arrive in Kent so far were 263 people, taken from seven dinghies on April 19.

After an eleven-day hiatus, during which no small boats entered UK waters, the first dinghy was spotted and intercepted around 1am on Sunday.

A source said that since that day there had been mainly “prevailing north-easterly winds, which combined with very high spring tides to make the English Channel unmanageable for small boats.

“Effectively you have the rising tide running fast in one direction and the northeast winds pushing in the other direction.”

“This combines to stir up the waves, which become unmanageable for small inflatables.”

So far this year, more than 6,700 people have arrived on small boats, significantly more than the same period last year.

Predictions that more than double the 28,526 people who crossed in 2021 could arrive this year have the Home Secretary and his officials scrambling to come up with possible solutions to the problem.

On April 14, the Royal Navy took command of operations to detect and intercept migrants from the English Channel.

On the same day, Interior Minister Priti Patel also signed an agreement with the Rwandan government to allow the transfer of certain migrants to that country. It is understood that initially women, children and families would not be sent to Rwanda.

Those sent to Rwanda are believed to be single men crossing the UK using irregular routes, such as small boats, or in the back of lorries.

The plan is actually a one-way trip. Even if the Rwandan authorities granted asylum, anyone sent there would not be allowed to live in the UK and would have to stay in the African nation.

After an eleven-day hiatus, during which no small boats entered UK waters, the first dinghy was spotted and intercepted around 1am on Sunday.

After an eleven-day hiatus, during which no small boats entered UK waters, the first dinghy was spotted and intercepted around 1am on Sunday.

Speaking to The Political Correction on GB News today, Home Secretary Tom Pursglove was asked if Rwandan politics already have a chilling effect?

He said: “I think it’s too early to comment authoritatively on the effect the policy has had.

“But I honestly think we need to change the dynamic and change the dial because the status quo just couldn’t last.

“I think there’s a big chilling effect associated with that. By ending that link, between getting in a little boat and coming to Britain and thinking that you have a very realistic prospect of staying in Britain indefinitely. Brittany.”

Home Secretary Tom Pursglove

Home Secretary Tom Pursglove

Speaking before he received news of the latest interceptions in the English Channel, the Minister added: ‘This is the start, we have seen obviously mixed reports on this in the various newspapers saying they will certainly not not the trip now because of politics, others say they will do the trip anyway.

“But I think overall what we are going to find is that individuals, as they are relocated to Rwanda, will have a deterrent effect.

“Local sources in Calais said hundreds of migrants have gathered in the area in recent days.

“They are effectively piling up, waiting for the weather to improve so they can make the trip.”

While conditions are expected to improve further tomorrow, the UK authorities are preparing for an increase in the number of small boats in the days to come.